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Career Education and Vocational Training

Do you wonder where and how you can acquire job skills, training, and education you need?  Explore these many training avenues and resources to find out!

 

Contents

I.    Education and Training Avenues

Colleges, Universities and Technical Schools

Distance Education

Apprenticeship Programs

On-the-Job Training (OJT)

Vocational Training Programs for People with Disabilities

Supported Employment

Subcontract Training and Employment Programs

II.   Education and Training Assistance Services

Agencies Serving People with Disabilities

One-Stop Centers (Nationwide)

III.  College Transition Guides for People with Disabilities

Online College Transition Guides

IV.  Educational Preparation Programs

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

GED

High School Completion

Developmental Education

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I.     Education and Training Avenues

 

COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS

 

The following links will provide the direction and guidance you need!  Visit colleges, universities, and technical schools across the country!

 

Post-ITT    

     Post-ITT is a college transition resource and guide for students with 
     disabilities, parents, and school personnel.  The web site provides a 
     growing directory of colleges by state and the Disability Services contact
     person at each college.

College and Career Programs for Deaf Students   

     This is a national directory profiling colleges and their services and 
     programs for deaf students.

U.S. Community and Technical Colleges  - State Listings 

U.S. Public Colleges and Universities  - State Listings 

U.S. Private Colleges and Universities  - State Listings 

Peterson's Education Center     

     Petersons, the publisher of guides to colleges, provides information
     online about college undergraduate and graduate programs.  This site
     also provides information on professional training and long-distance 
     education programs.

Major Decisions

               Find out what you can do with a variety of college majors!  Click on a major
               and see the major's sub-fields and career paths, related careers, and links
               to other web sites.  This site is operated by the University of North Carolina
               at Wilmington.

Peterson's Education Center:  Graduate and Professional Study

              This site provides an index of graduate and professional study programs.

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DISTANCE EDUCATION

 

Would you like the independence and schedule flexibility of distance learning courses and degree programs?  These links will direct you to that option!

If you live outside Oregon, contact your local two- or four-year college for information on distance learning opportunities in your area.  Also, see the Peterson's Education Center link that follows.

Distance education deliveries include:

 

Telecourses:                       Pre-produced television courses viewed on cable, 
                                               rented video tapes, or video tapes available at 
                                               campus libraries.

Online courses:                 Computer courses delivered via Internet and e-mail.

ITV or Tel-Net Courses:   Live interactive courses held at various campus
                                                locations via video and two-way audio.

 

The following web sites will connect you to distance education courses, programs, and catalogs!

 

Oregon's One-Stop College/University - Distance Education Catalog

  This is Oregon's statewide college and university distance learning catalog!

Oregon Community Colleges Distance Learning Catalog

            View the distance learning catalog for community colleges in Oregon and
            Southwest Washington at this site.

Seattle Community College - Distance Learning

            See SCC's courses, programs, and degree options available through distance
            learning.

Peterson's Education Center

            This site includes information on long-distance education programs nationwide!

The International Distance Learning Course Finder

            Locate distance learning courses by course name, course subject, country,
            or institution name.

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APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS

 

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a training system by which the worker learns a skilled craft or trade on the job while taking related coursework.  There are approximately 120 occupations that have active apprenticeship programs in Oregon.

The training arrangement is based on available openings and a written agreement between the apprentice and employer.  Sample apprenticeships include skill crafts or trades such as bricklayer, electrician, cabinet maker, baker, television service repair, plumber, and carpenter to name only a few.

To learn about apprenticeship training opportunities in Oregon and Washington, visit the following web sites!  In other states, contact your state's Labor and Industry or Employment Department listed in the state government section of your phone book for information about apprenticeship opportunities.

 

Apprenticeship and Training  -  Oregon

Apprenticeship and Training  -  Washington State

 

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ON-THE-JOB TRAINING  (OJT)

 

What is on-the-job training?

On-the-job training can be a formal or informal arrangement by which a person receives "hands-on" job training at a work site.  The training is provided directly by the employer.  In most cases, job skills are acquired through actual work experience rather than through an educational training program.

What kind of on-the-job training is available?

On-the-job training opportunities are limitless.  Examples of work training might include occupation areas such as landscape maintenance, food service, office or clerical work, printing, repair services, and manufacturing production to name only a few.  The sky's the limit!

How can I explore and arrange on-the-job training?

The following resources are possible avenues to on-the-job training opportunities.  Where possible, links will be provided!

 

RESOURCES FOR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES:

 

Vocational Rehabilitation:

Vocational Rehabilitation Division  -  Oregon

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  -  Washington State

Vocational Rehabilitation Division  -  State Listings

 

Commission for the Blind:

Commission for the Blind  -  Oregon

Washington State Department of Services for the Blind

Commission for the Blind  -  State Listings

 

Veterans Vocational Rehabilitation:

Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

Veterans Vocational Rehabilitation  -  State Listings

 

Community Colleges:

Check to see if your local community college offers a Professional Skills Training Program for on-the-job training.  College tuition plus additional program fees are charged.  Training is tailored and arranged based on individual interest, training opportunities, and applicant qualifications.

The following web site describes and provides information about the Professional Skills Program at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon.  Check with your local college to see if a similar program is available!

Professional Skills Program - Portland Community College

 

Public and Private Sector:

IAM CARES of Oregon

IAM CARES  (Nationwide)

          IAM CARES provides individuals with disabilities comprehensive and customized
          placement and training services using a work-based approach in partnership with
          the public and private sector.  Clients are referred by the State Vocational
          Rehabilitation and One-Stop Centers.

Job Training Partnership Act  (JTPA)  -   (National)
(no web site)

         The Job Training and Partnership Act (JTPA), a joint venture between the public
         and private sector, trains and places individuals who are economically 
         disadvantaged, including people with disabilities, in the labor market.

         The Program is administered by the Governor's office in each state.  Services to
         individuals may include:   On-the-job training, basic work skills training and
         development, job recruiting, transition services, job support services, and
         customized training and retraining programs.

         JTPA may set up on-the-job training at a work site and reimburse an employer
         50% of the first six months of wages for each employee who is eligible for the
         program.  Disabled adults (22 years or older) and youths (16 - 21 years old)
         are economically disadvantaged if they meet the criteria and definition of the
         Federal, State, or local welfare system.

         For more information, contact your local Private Industry Council, the Chamber
         of Commerce, state government agencies (like Vocational Rehabilitation),
         your high school Work Experience Coordinator, or organizations involved with
         employment of people with disabilities.

 

Family and Friends:

On-the-job training opportunities are often arranged through family and friends at their work site!  Family and friends can often provide a direct avenue and link to training opportunities.

For example, does someone in your family work in an office where clerical help and support are needed?  Do you have a friend or relative that has a landscaping business and could use extra help?  By letting people know of your training interests and needs, you'll be surprised to find how many opportunities might be available for receiving work training!

 

Employers:

On-the-job training opportunities can also be arranged by making direct contact with local employers.  Some employers may welcome the additional help and may be willing to provide job training.

When meeting with an employer, be sure to apply all the "make-a-good-impression" techniques:  show interest in the business;  communicate the many positive benefits to the employer;  and highlight and emphasize your good work habits, especially your responsibility and reliability.  An employer will be much more receptive to providing on-the-job training if he or she feels such an arrangement will be an asset and benefit for the business.

 

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VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

 

The following programs offer vocational training and placement services, as well as evaluations, to eligible clients with disabilities.  Contact the individual providers for information on career tracks currently available.  New ones are frequently added!

Training is often provided in small group settings and individualized as much as possible.  In addition to offering job placement services and assistance upon training completion, some programs offer and provide subcontract work opportunities at community-based business locations.

Clients are often referred to these programs by support agencies, such as Vocational Rehabilitation, but direct contact is possible as well.  For current cost and fee information, contact the individual provider.

 

Vocational Training Programs

 

St. Vincent dePaul Rehabilitation Service, Inc.  (Portland, Hillsboro, and Salem, OR)

       In addition to a wide range of vocational training programs, St. Vincent dePaul also
       offers an Office Skills Training Program for the Deaf at their Portland facility.

Goodwill Industries International, Inc.   (Nationwide locations)

       Goodwill Industries International is a network of 209 community-based,
       autonomous member organizations around the world that serve people with
       workplace disadvantages and disabilities by providing job training and
       employment services, as well as job placement opportunities and post-
       employment support.  Visit the Goodwill web site to locate the Goodwill
       agency nearest you.

Culinary Assistant Program - Portland Community College  (OR)

       For information about the Culinary Assistant Program, contact:

                                Lee Fan, Coordinator
                                Culinary Assistant Program
                                Portland Community College - Sylvania Campus
                                (503) 977-4305
                                E-mail:   lfan@pcc.edu

Portland Habilitation Center  (Portland, OR)

Oregon Industries for the Blind  (Portland, OR)

 

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SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT

 

What is supported employment?

Supported employment is a work arrangement by which a person with a disability receives long-term work support and assistance while employed in the community.

How does it work?

A person with a disability is either referred by a support agency, such as Developmental Disability Services or Vocational Rehabilitation, or makes direct contact with a public or private nonprofit organization or corporation that provides supported employment services.  

Clients are trained and placed in community-based jobs that include individual placements or enclave (group) placements in local businesses.  The sponsoring organization or corporation provides individualized help and support to the clients and employer.

Where can I find supported employment programs?

Your local county Developmental Disabilities Services office or state Vocational Rehabilitation Division office should be able to refer you to programs available in your community.  

Also contact the Association for Persons in Supported Employment (APSE), a national organization with individual state chapters.  The national office or your state chapter listed at the web site may provide referral information.  The APSE's web site has a bulletin board for discussions related to supported employment and other disability-related topics, as well as a calendar of events for upcoming conferences, workshops and activities.

 

Following is a partial listing of supported employment services available in Oregon's Portland and Salem area:

 

Supported Employment Services

 

Tualatin Valley Workshop  (Hillsboro, OR)

CCI Enterprises   (Milwaukie, OR)

Edwards Center, Inc.   (Washington and Clackamas Counties, OR)
(no web site)

               Contact:     Edwards Center, Inc.
                                   P.O. Box 6269
                                  Aloha, OR  97007
                                  (503) 642-1581, x25

Mid-Valley Rehabilitation, Inc.   (Amity and McMinnville, OR)

Oregon Industries for the Blind   (Portland, OR)

 

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SUBCONTRACT TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT

 

What are subcontract programs?

Subcontract programs are operated by nonprofit organizations and corporations to provide training and work opportunities for people with disabilities.  Clients with disabilities train and work at the program's onsite facilities or perform work assignments at community-based business locations.

How does it work?

Nonprofit programs work with businesses to meet their labor needs by matching workers with disabilities to contracted jobs.  Workers' earnings are paid by the nonprofit program, not the business.  The nonprofit program provides the training, adaptive equipment (if needed), and paid work opportunities.

The following programs offer subcontract work arrangements.  Contact the individual programs to learn about work training opportunities available.

 

Subcontract Programs:

 

Tualatin Valley Workshop, Inc.   (Hillsboro and McMinnville, OR)

CCI Enterprises   (Milwaukie, OR)

St. Vincent dePaul Rehabilitation Services, Inc.   (Portland, Hillsboro, and Salem, OR)

Edwards Enterprises   (Hillsboro and Milwaukie)
(no web site)

          Contact:     Edwards Enterprises
                             P.O. Box 6269
                             Aloha, OR  97007
                             (503) 642-1581, x25

Portland Habilitation Center   (Portland, OR)

Oregon Industries for the Blind   (Portland, OR)

Mid-Valley Rehabilitation, Inc.   (Amity and McMinnville, OR)

 

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II.     Education and Training Assistance Services

 

 

AGENCIES SERVING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

 

The following agencies provide vocational counseling and guidance, evaluations, training and educational assistance, job placement services, and preparation for independent living.

 

Vocational Rehabilitation:

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Division

Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Vocational Rehabilitation Division  -  State Listings

 

Commission for the Blind:

Oregon Commission for the Blind

Washington State Department of Services for the Blind

Commission for the Blind  -  State Listings

 

Developmental Disabilities:

Developmental Disabilities Services   (Multnomah County, OR)

Office of Developmental Disabilities  -  Oregon State

Division of Developmental Disabilities  -  Washington State

 

Veterans Vocational Rehabilitation:

Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

Veterans Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Services  -  State Listings

 

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ONE-STOP CENTERS

 

The Workforce Investment Act of 1998

 

Who it covers:    

Dislocated workers;  specific population groups, including people
with disabilities;

Employers

What it does:      Provides One-Stop employment-related services to job seekers,
                               employees, and employers

Description:

America's Workforce Network is a nationwide system of workforce development organizations that help employers find qualified workers and help people prepare for and manage their careers.

The nationwide One-Stop Center system, now in place across the country, provides a single point in local communities where customers can access a wide array of job training, education and employment services.  It also provides a single point of contact for employers to provide information about current job openings and business needs.

At One-Stop Centers, relevant service programs are together under one roof to simplify the process for customers to access services needed from multiple programs.  Participating One-Stop Center service programs include Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, and many others.

Key Features:

The One-Stop Centers include:

Streamlined services:   

Programs and providers are together at one location.  Services can be easily accessed and coordinated.

Employment-related access: 

Individuals have access to job-related information, including job 
vacancies, career options, training information, student financial aid, employment trends, job searching, resume preparation, and interview preparation.

Individual Training Account:

Eligible customers, in consultation with their case manager, can purchase training services through an Individual Training Account (ITA).  If a person is eligible for training services, an ITA will be established for the individual by the One-Stop Center.  The One-Stop Center assists the individual in selecting a training provider.

Core services:

Core services to individuals include intake and orientation, intitial assessment, determination of eligibility for additional services, job search and placement assistance, career counseling, information on child care and transportation, labor market information, and follow-up services.  These services are available to all.

Intensive services:

Intensive services include comprehensive assessment of skill levels and service needs, development of individual employment plans, individual counseling and career planning, group counseling, case management, and short-term prevocational services, such as development of learning, communication, and personal maintenance skills.  These services are provided to eligible individuals.

Training services:

Training services may include occupational skills training, on-the-job training, training programs operated by the private sector, skill upgrading and retraining, entrepreneurial (self-employment) training, job readiness training, adult education and literacy, and customized training.  These services are provided to eligible individuals.

 

To locate your nearest One-Stop Center, or to receive more information, call the toll-free help line at 1-877-872-5627 or 1-877-887-5627 (TTY).  You can also locate your nearest One-Stop Center at this web site:

America's Service Locator

 

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III.         College Transition Guides for People 
                             with Disabilities

 

ONLINE COLLEGE TRANSITION GUIDES

 

Are you planning to head to college?  Will you need accommodations?  Assistive technology?  If the answer is yes, you won't want to miss the following transition guides!

The following online guides provide excellent information and activities that will help you make a smooth and successful transition to college.

 

College Transition Guides:

 

Post - ITT   (College Transition Guide for Students with Disabilities)

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Post-Secondary Education:
Know Your Rights and Responsibilities

     This is a document produced by the U.S. Department of Education,
     Office of Civil Rights.

LD in Depth:  Transition   (Guide to Preparing and Transitioning to College)

     This site offers numerous transition guides and articles.

Selecting a College for Students with Learning Disabilities or ADHD

Transition from High School to College:  Students with Disabilities

     This transition guide has been produced by Oklahoma AHEAD.  

 

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IV.    Educational Preparation Programs

 

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION

 

The following educational preparation program is available at most community colleges.  Contact your local community college for program and schedule information.

Description:   

Adult Basic Education (ABE) provides non-credit classes in basic reading,
writing and math intended for those without a high school diploma.

Requirements: 

18 years or older, without a high school diploma or GED.

If 16-18 years, must bring release from the high school.

Subjects:     Reading, writing, arithmetic

Special education:     None

Cost:     No charge

Certificate awarded:     None

Accommodations:     To arrange class accommodations, contact the college's 
                                        Disability Services Office.

 

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GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT (GED)

 

The following educational preparation program is available at most community colleges and other community locations.  Contact your local community college for program and schedule information.

 

Description:

GED programs provide non-credit instructional support as students prepare
to take tests that demonstrate high school equivalency.  Students work at their
own rate or take classes.

Requirements:

18 years or older, without high school diploma or GED

If 16-18 years, must bring release from high school unless contract
with college provides GED

Subjects:     Math, writing, science, social studies, reading

Special Education:     None

Cost:     No charge or a small fee (may vary).  Fees charged for GED testing.

Certificate awarded:     GED Certificate

Accommodations:

For GED class accommodations:   Contact the college's Disability Services 
                                                             Office.

For GED test accommodations:      Contact the GED Program Coordinator 
                                                             for instructions.  Advance accommodation
                                                             arrangements and approval from the 
                                                             state GED office are required.   

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HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION PROGRAM

 

The following education preparation program may be available at your local community college.  Contact your nearest community college for program and course information.

 

Description:     The High School Completion Program provides college credit courses
                             for completing high school graduation requirements.

Requirements:   

18 years or older, without high school diploma or GED;

Must provide high school transcript;

If 16-18 years, must bring release from high school
unless contract with college provides high school diploma.

Subjects:     Personal finance;  world history;  English;  Algebra;  Physical Education;
                       Biology;  American Government.   (Courses may vary by college).

Special education:     None

Cost:     College tuition per credit/unit hour and fees;  cost of textbooks and supplies.

Certificate awarded:     High School Diploma

Accommodations:    For class accommodations, contact the college's Disability
                                       Services Office.

 

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DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION COURSES

 

The following educational preparation courses may be available at your local community college.  Contact your nearest community college for program and course schedule information.

 

Description:

Developmental Education courses are non-transfer college credit courses
in math, writing, reading, spelling and study skills.

Requirements:

18 years or older, with high school diploma or GED;

Scored below college level on placement tests in either math,
reading or writing;

Students are placed in appropriate course according to placement
test scores.

     Note:  Requirements may vary by college.  Contact your local community
     college for program information and requirements.

Subjects:     Reading, writing, basic grammar, vocabulary, spelling, study skills,
                       arithmetic, elementary algebra, math word problems.

               Note:  Subjects vary by college.  Contact your local community college
               for course availability and information.

Special education:     None

Cost:     College tuition per credit/unit hour and fees;  cost of textbooks and supplies.

Certificate awarded:     None

Accommodations:    For class accommodations, contact the college's Disability
                                       Services Office.

 

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